Thoughts on Life and The Awesomeness of College

It’s official…I’m a college graduate! On May 10 I walked across the stage and had the opportunity to celebrate with my family and friends. It was such a bittersweet day. Although I’m sad to see college career come to an end, I’m excited to take the next steps in my career.

Let the future begin!

Let the future begin!

As we all know, college isn’t just about the books. There are so many life lessons the college experience teaches so well. Here are five of my favorites:

1. If you want to achieve goals, make them happen…starting now.

The summer before I went to college, my church’s youth pastor and his wife coached me on college readiness to help prepare me as much as possible for life as a college student. One of the most valuable pieces of wisdom they shared with me was that if I wanted to instill a new habit, I had to start as soon as I arrived to campus or as soon as my semester started. If not, busyness and routine would take over and any hopes of accomplishing that goal would most likely slip through the cracks.

This was GREAT advice. Right when I got to college, I set aside the time I needed to reach my goals, such as going to the gym, staying in touch with family and friends and practicing (I was a music major at the time).

As I plan out what my life will look like in the future, I know it will be more of a challenge to set good habits, as more responsibilities add up. However, it isn’t impossible and achieving goals is important no matter what stage of life I’m in.

2. Mom and Dad are cool.

There’s this shift that happens usually right before high school ends or halfway through the first year of college where mom and dad are suddenly cool! When I left for college I remember being excited to be on my own, but every time my parents made the trip up to Denton for the weekend I was always very excited to spend time with them.

Not only are they cool but also smart, contrary to what my teenage self credited them. I’m thankful that my parents were so involved in my college experience. My mom basically knew more than my advisors and quickly became a pro at helping me plan out my schedules so I could graduate with a degree and a half in four years. I’ve grown rather close to my parents, as I should. They’re the only ones I have.

3. Detours are sometimes the best things that can happen to you. 

I was a double major in music and public relations my first and second years of college. I knew I loved music and also knew I loved to write, although I wasn’t exactly sure I knew what PR was quite yet. As a music student I participated in music ensembles, took lessons and learned theory and music history at one of the most prestigious music schools in the nation. I really enjoyed it, but quickly saw my passion fading after hours on top of hours of practicing and struggling through my music theory assignments.

I finally came to a point where I had to choose. PR won and I’ve never regretted that decision, nor have I regretted the time spent making music at the University of North Texas. Some of my closest friends were made through the marching band and some of my favorite memories were in the music building and performance hall.

4. You don’t have to be the smartest to stand out.

I was honored as the Outstanding PR Student of the Year at the journalism banquet in May, an award chosen by the Mayborn School of Journalism’s faculty. It was a very exciting moment, that’s for sure.

A lot of people who congratulated me said things like, “Wow! You must make really good grades!” The truth is I’ve never been an extremely academic person. I worked VERY hard to make good grades in school, which paid off in the end, but certainly wasn’t a walk in the park for me as it was for some of my friends growing up.

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2014 Outstanding Public Relations Student in the Department of Strategic Communications at UNT

I think the key to being successful and standing out is hard work and being passionate about what you do. During my college career I had seven different internships, was the president of UNT’s Chapter of PRSSA and was the kind of person who attended networking events and watched webinars on her days off. People would always comment on how busy I seemed, but I was just doing what I think is fun! Those internships and tough classes flew by because I absolutely love what I do.

As my youngest sister and cousin graduate from high school this year I sincerely hope they fall in love with their major as I did. It makes college (an life)THAT more awesome and rewarding.

5. Friendships are a gift, not a guarantee

After I graduated high school I started to lose touch with some of people I considered best friends during middle or high school. It was sad at first, but as I changed and grew, my old friends were changing and growing too.

These two drove four hours to come see me graduate! Lindsay (left) has been a best friend of mine for 11 years and Kelsey (right) is a friend I met my freshman year. She transferred to UT Austin for nursing school, but we have stayed close ever since :)

These two drove four hours to come see me graduate! Lindsay (left) has been a best friend of mine for 11 years and Kelsey (right) is a friend I met my freshman year. She transferred to UT Austin for nursing school, but we have stayed close ever since 🙂

There are several friendships I have that have lasted more than ten years, but college taught me the value of learning when to fight for those friendships and when to let go to make room for others. Letting go of friendships is bittersweet, but I can’t think of a time where new friendships weren’t blossoming. I’ve been blessed with wonderful friends and as I’ve grown older, I’ve been even more thankful for these gifts and realized that they are blessings that I am not entitled to.

Here are some of the friends that made college such a wonderful time in my life:

This month I’ll be moving to Dallas, standing by one of the friends I’ve known the longest as she marries the man of her dreams, starting the next chapter in my career and vacationing with my family in Boston. I’ll miss the ability to plan my own schedule, nap times between classes and exciting intern adventures as a college student, but I’m so excited to see what the future has in store.

“ Many are the plans in the mind of a man, but it is the purpose of the Lord that will stand.” – Proverbs 19:21

What are your favorite things about your college experience?

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April Five: Ethical Decision Making

When you reach a fork in the road, will you know which road to take?

When you reach a fork in the road, will you know which road to take?


It’s hard to believe my college career is almost over! I have been taking my last required course this semester, which is Ethics, Law and Diversity in Strategic Communication, the inspiration behind many of my blog posts this year. Although this class is my last required course, it’s definitely not the least. Although it’s important to be experienced and educated on topics in public relations to have a successful career, ethics is the only facet of any industry that can make or break a career in a matter of seconds. This class has taught me lifelong methods for making ethical decisions and has equipped me with resources I know will refer to many years from now.

Here are five resources and decision-making tools that I have used in-depth this semester:

1. LEAP is a decision-making model that I learned at the beginning of the semester that I plan to keep handy as I “LEAP” into my first job. This is a great model to use for any decision, as it is thorough and asks a few really great questions.

L- Learn everything you can

  • What are the key facts and data?
  • What outcome is important?
  • Which laws/policies/codes apply? (Always keep the PRSA Code of Ethics handy)
  • What raises an ethical red flag?
  • Who are the stakeholders?

E- Evaluate your options

  • Level 1: If all stakeholders agree, move ahead
  • Level 2: When it’ s not that simple…
  • Consult a mentor for a fresh perspective
  • Identify key consequences

A-  Access your intuition

  • Can you sleep at night knowing you made a certain decision?
  • What would your mother think about said decision?
  • As my professor says, “how would you feel if your decisions today were tomorrow’s headlines?”

P- Put your decision into action

  • Time to act
  • Evaluate

2. The Potter Box is a decision-making tool created by Harvard’s Ralph Potter that helps break down an ethical dilemma into a definition, list of values, principles and loyalties that help the user make a final decision. This model is useful in seeing the bigger picture when making important choices that will have consequences, good or bad.

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  • Definition: What took place?
  • Values: What values come into play in each decision you could take? (Values can be professional, logical, moral, sociocultural or religious).
  • Principles: What moral principle is applicable to this situation?
  • Loyalties: How will your decision affect those who you are loyal to?

3. The PRSA Code of Ethics has basically been my Bible throughout this course. Even before taking this ethics class I have used the PRSA Code of Ethics at PRSSA conferences and events, but I know this will always be a helpful tool and reminder of the important values each professional should exercise

4. Case Studies- How can we ensure the past wont repeat itself if we don’t know the history of ethics in public relations and advertising? I enjoyed participating in four case studies this semester that helped me understand applied ethics on a deeper level and examine how an understanding of ethics can help professionals avoid major consequences. More importantly, conducting ethical business is much more rewarding and beneficial for the industry, the company and the community. Several case study projects I participated in include SeaWorld’s response to Blackfish, Dolce and Gabbana’s “fantasy rape” ad campaign and BP’s crisis management in the destructive oil spill. I hope to continue paying attention as case studies play out so I know how to handle my own if the time comes.

5. Lastly, I’ve been learning how a network of reliable professionals can be important throughout my career. The longer I’ve had internships, the more I know how easy it is to stumble into potential ethics blunders. As a new professional it’s so important to have mentors who have been in the field longer than I have so I they can guide me along the way and help me spot potential crises. It doesn’t matter how old or experienced you are—there’s always more to learn.

I look forward to a lifelong journey of learning, experiencing and blazing trails. Graduation is only the beginning!

PR Needs Better PR

One morning as I was walking to class I noticed I was walking the same pace as a young man headed in the same direction. We smiled awkwardly and continued on. Finally he looked over my way, laughed and introduced himself. After I introduced myself to him he asked what my major is. I was not expecting what happened next.

 “Public relations? People like you are the reason the government and media are so corrupt,” he yelled. “I hope you have fun making the world a worse place someday,” and he stormed off (After throwing in a few expletives).

 The rest of the day I sat at my desk wrestling with his harsh words. Although there’s a chance he had no idea what he was talking about, he has a point. Ironically, pubic relations needs better public relations.

Why Ethics?

The reason PR is lacking a positive reputation boils down to one word: Ethics.

Ethics are capable of building up someone’s identity in a positive way or capsizing it, drowning any hopes of a successful future.  Poor ethical choices can tear away a person’s privacy and swap a tailored Armani suit for an orange jumpsuit. Even if the poor decision never comes to the surface, the guilty person or party will suffer a clouded conscience and live in fear of being found out. Misguided ethics can lead to joblessness and in some cases, infamy. There is tremendous power in choices.

PR crises are a dime a dozen and many ex-professionals (or current pros who have managed to salvage what’s left of their reputation) are victims of their own poor ethical choices. Identity is a delicate thing.

I admit…many of the real-life ethical breaches brought up in my ethics and media law class happened well before my time. I was not as familiar with some of them as I knew I should be. I decided to research more about each case. As I began, I noticed something interesting. Before the name of the company/person was fully spelled out in the Google search bar, I knew almost exactly what area of ethics had been violated.

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When an individual makes unethical choices that are brought to light, they weave new words into their identity. Personal branding is a real thing and when someone’s identity is paired with words such as “scandal,” and “plagiarism,” I think it’s safe to say that the outcome isn’t good.

Ethical practice not only helps businesses stay out of trouble, but it also allows for peace of mind that comes with a clear conscience. Pubic relations can only be properly practiced with credibility, which is reinforced by good ethics. If there’s no credibility, there’s no business.

Proceed With Caution

Although there are situations where ethics are black and white, oftentimes there’s a grey area between what is ethical and unethical.

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Just because something is legal does not mean that it is ethical, and just because something is ethical does not mean it’s also credible.

The diagram to the right illustrates that what is ethical, credible and legal are connected but separate. Just because something is legal does not mean that it is ethical, and just because something is ethical does not mean it’s also credible. It is not uncommon for PR practitioners to be asked to do something questionable by persons of authority. It’s important to have a plan for these situations to ensure that the ethical, legal and credible decision will be made.  Sometimes this can involve standing up for what is right—maybe even at the expense of your job.

A decision-making model from Trust, Inc. advises the following steps when confronting an ethical dilemma:

L- Learn everything you can

  • What are the key facts and data?
  • What outcome is important?
  • Which laws/policies/codes apply? (Always keep the PRSA Code of Ethics handy)
  • What raises an ethical red flag?
  • Who are the stakeholders?

E- Evaluate your options

  • Level 1: If all stakeholders agree, move ahead
  • Level 2: When it’ s not that simple…
  • Consult a mentor for a fresh perspective
  • Identify key consequences

A-  Access your intuition

  • Can you sleep at night knowing you made a certain decision?
  • What would your mother think about said decision?
  • As my professor says, “how would you feel if your decisions today were tomorrow’s headlines?”

P- Put your decision into action

  • Time to act
  • Evaluate

No matter what decision you make, always:

  • Be honest
  • Be respectful
  • Be transparent

It’s important to be educated on ethics because a snap decision during a crisis can have negative consequences. Stay up to date on current issues and put yourself in the shoes of professionals in crisis. In addition, it’s important to be educated on the code of ethics for your company or industry to have an idea of, and prepare for, issues that could arise.

With my college graduation on the horizon, I am working hard to be prepared to face anything that might come my way during my professional career. I know PR has a long way to go when it comes to having a positive reputation in the public eye, but I fully intend to do my part in reversing the stigma. This might be a challenge, but in the end I hope I can say I’ve left a positive mark on the profession.

Can’t Put a Price Tag on Passion

My grandmother always told me growing up, “Success is doing what you love and getting paid for it.” I’ve been very fortunate during my college years to have found my passion and gained experience in internships and leadership positions on campus.

As I enter my last year of college and start thinking about where I’d like to work after I graduate, I really hope to find myself in a work environment that challenges me and helps me learn and grow. I hope that I will find my work to be meaningful and a salary would be a great step up!

Although I’m looking forward to ultimate freedom from textbook fees and the good ol’ college budget — complete with Ramen noodles and thrift-store dresses — I’m finding that my salary will probably matter less than I thought it would.

This semester I’m taking an honors leadership class and I love the real-world applicable insight I’ve been gaining on leadership, professional development and personality strengths. Accompanying a recent discussion on motivation, my class watched the TED Talk, “The Puzzle of Motivation” by Daniel Pink. In the presentation, Pink has a lot to say about the differences between management and leadership. An overlying theme of the story is that, “there’s a mismatch in what science know and business does.”

Science has proven that although financial incentives are commonly given to motivate people in the business world today, financial incentives are worthless without passion. Many managers try to coerce their subordinates with carrots and sticks, punishing or rewarding them, which narrows the focus of the followers in effect. Although motivation via carrots and sticks might’ve worked in the past, in today’s day and age, right-brain creative and conceptual thinking cannot be coerced and the companies that cultivate engaging environments derive higher levels of productivity and better overall employee satisfaction. It’s a win-win.

In conclusion, Daniel Pink gives three points as the new operation system for leaders and managers that have worn out the carrot and stick method.  The three points are autonomy, mastery and purpose.

  • Autonomy is the urge to direct our own lives. Autonomy explains that self-direction provides more engagement.
  • Mastery is the desire to get better and better at something that matters. This envelopes intrinsic motivation, which is doing work because we believe that what we’re doing is important.
  • Lastly, purpose is the yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves. These three points are important because moving into a new era of accepting scientific proof that financial incentives don’t work and moving forward with new methods involving empowering employees rather than coercing them to do their work.

In these least seven months before graduation, I’m focusing on following my purpose and gaining mastery. I’m very passionate about what I do. The more I study public relations, the more I find it to be my calling. Because I feel that what I’m doing matters, I’m motivated to move toward mastery and keep going even though it’s stressful at times. Autonomy in my previous work environment helps me work on my own schedule and I’ve found I’m most productive when I budget my time wisely.

Passion is something that money can’t buy and I’m thankful for the students, mentors and professors that have helped me learn over the past few years. I hope that my upcoming job search will be fruitful and that I will find a work environment that plays up my creative strengths and helps me see the bigger picture.

Ethics in PR: Six questions to consider when offered an unpaid internship

September is Ethics Month for the PR community. To celebrate, I wanted to touch on a major topic affecting public relations students and employers today: unpaid internships.

Unpaid internships received a lot of buzz this summer after two unpaid production interns that worked on the movie “Black Swan” sued 20th Century Fox for giving them the workload similar to the that of their salaried full-time coworkers. Sure enough, they won.

Read more details of the ruling from The Atlantic Wire.

Are unpaid internships lawful?

The Fair Labor Standards Act released six criteria employers must follow in order to offer lawful unpaid internships. In summary;

  •  Lawful unpaid internships should not advance the employer’s company financially nor should interns fill the role of a salaried employee.
  •  Lawful unpaid internships must be oriented for the benefit of the intern, with direct supervision and an educational environment.
  •  Lawful unpaid internships must not entitle interns to a job after completion.
  • Lawful unpaid internships must be offered with honesty, disclosing upfront that the position is unpaid.

Expanding on the criteria above, a notable point is that the internship must be beneficial for the intern. This is very important because the overall benefit of accepting internships is to learn and grow as a future professional.

As you weigh your options, consider asking employers about opportunities to expand your professional network, add to your portfolio or participate in training or a mentoring program while
interning with a company. If none of these opportunities are available, it might be best to keep looking.

Are unpaid internships ethical?

As the maxim goes, just because something is lawful, does not always mean it’s ethical.

A survey by the Public Relations Consultants Association found that out of about 150 new public relations professionals, approximately 23 percent held an internship with no pay and only 28 percent of the professionals in the research group were paid at or above minimum wage. The others were either paid a stipend or had some expenses covered by the employer.

Among many concerns expressed in response to this data, researchers found that diversity was compromised. The reality of the situation is that economically challenged applicants had to turn down the opportunity because they could not afford accepting an unpaid internship. In addition, graduates lacking internship experience have lower chances of receiving a job in a competitive market, which is often difficult for students of lower income families. Paid internships are much less prevalent, according to data from the survey, making it difficult for students to gain experience. These issues have called to question the ethics of unpaid internships.

The Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) issued a Professional Standards Advisory in February 2011 about the ethical use of interns. This document makes a case for interns and adds perspective for employers who may not understand that course credit is often costly for the student, as well as travel expenses such as gasoline and car maintenance.

Lastly, the document specifically names code provisions and professional values in the PRSA Member Code of Ethics that are often overlooked in decisions involving unpaid internships.

Is an unpaid internship for you?

There will be unpaid internships as long as students are willing to accept them. However, sometimes taking an unpaid internship is worth it in the long run.

First of all, no matter what your pay is at an internship, recognize and value the time and/or money the company invests in you as an intern. However, as you pursue opportunities, don’t sell yourself short by accepting an opportunity that will not ultimately help you succeed and accomplish your goals in public relations. It might take time, but develop a keen eye for opportunities that will shape your future.

If you’re ever offered an unpaid internship you’d hate to turn down, ask yourself these questions:

  1. Does this internship abide by the Fair Labor Standards Act?
  2. Will this internship give you opportunities to add to your resume and portfolio?
  3. Can you get the same opportunities elsewhere? (Note: volunteering at a nonprofit organization or helping with the communications tasks at your part time job can be great alternatives)
  4.   Is this internship feasible for your budget?
  5.  Is there a way you can divide your time between a part time job and your internship?
  6. Are you motivated to do well at this internship despite the fact you won’t be receiving a paycheck?

PR Daily recently published an article about the things employers should expect from an unpaid intern. Overall the article ensures that unpaid interns will undoubtedly slack off at work and anything more shouldn’t be expected. Unpaid internships are often challenging, but if you accept an unpaid position and are aware of what you signed up for from the start (which you should, by law), there is nothing more detrimental for your career than performing poorly on the job. The world of public relations is interconnected and the chance you’ll be known as a slacker — at least in the area — is likely. If you don’t think you’ll be able to work with integrity at an unpaid internship, don’t accept one.

It all boils down to one simple question: does the benefit outweigh the cost?

As a Millennial, I’ve heard my fair share of accusations about entitlement of my generation. Yes, work is work, but it’s important to remember that we were never owed an internship and any opportunities we take should be received with gratefulness.

Whether you’re paid or not, internships cost companies money, and if you develop a keen eye for selecting lawful and ethical internships and the employer holds up their end, you will benefit greatly in the long run.

 What do you think about unpaid internships? Comment in the box below.

Summer Top Ten

As my last day of summer winds down (already?) and I prepare to return to classes for my last fall semester as a college student tomorrow it’s bittersweet, but also exciting. All this hard work is paying off and I’ve had so much fun along the way.

I compiled a lit of my favorite memories or accomplishments from this summer. Although my internship and job didn’t provide me with too much time off, this year I wanted to complete the ten things below:

1. Go somewhere exciting

This year my family went to Alaska. My mom had a goal to travel to all 50 states before her 50th birthday and Alaska was her 49th state (North Dakota was her 50th).  We went on an Alaskan cruise and stopped at Juneau, Icy Strait Point and Ketchikan. We went sea kayaking and I rode the longest zip line in the world! It was a great vacation. Here are a few photos of the trip’s highlights:

2. Intern at an agency

I had the opportunity to intern at an international agency in Dallas this summer with the Digital Team. I learned a lot about social media and analytics and loved being surrounded by young, brilliant PR professionals.

3. Reconnect with PRSSA friends

As president of UNT PRSSA, I had the honor, once again, of representing my Chapter at the PRSSA 2013 Leadership Rally! It was great to see friends new and old and learn more about the profession and planning a great semester. Want to see my notes from the last two years at the Rally? Download the PDF: PRSSA Leadership Rally Notes 2012-13.

When I was in Scottsdale, Arizona I had the opportunity to stop by the scene of summer’s most hilarious PR crisis, Amy’s Baking Company. In case you missed it, view the video here. Although I didn’t have bad service or witness anything notable, it was fun to see the infamous husband and wife team in person after seeing so much about them for a month. Plus, my lemon meringue pie was delicious.

4. Get published

My latest position at UNT has allowed me the opportunity to get my work published several times. I wrote several stories that were posted on UNT’s InHouse blog and even a few news releases. Maybe I’m just new at this, but I get excited every time I see my work published.

5. Read a good book

One of the best books I read this summer was on the airplane to the PRSSA Leadership Rally. It’s called The One Minute Manager. It wasn’t what I was expecting, but I loved the way it was written and the advice it had for busy, successful leaders.

You set One Minute Goals with your people to make sure they know what they are being held accountable for and what good performance looks like. You then try to catch them doing something right so you can give them a One Minute Praising. And then, finally, if they have all the skills to do something right and they don’t, you give them a One Minute Reprimand.

I loved this book because it taught me a lot about leadership and helping those that are following you better understand expectations and how to make them feel valued and appreciated, while at the same time, getting things done.

6. Make a new friend

I always love making new friends. I was at church one Sunday and I sat down next to a girl I didn’t recognize. After talking with her for a few minutes I found that she was from out of state and had come to Denton to take a 5-week class for her major that was only offered at UNT. She didn’t know anyone, so I made myself available and saw her many more times before she flew back to Indiana! I was so thankful I randomly sat down by her and I hope to see her again someday soon.

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Thankful for good times with friends this summer

7. Start one new good habit

I’m really hoping this habit carries over into the school year, but I focused a lot on productivity and prioritization this summer. Time is money and at my internship, I had to be fast in order to meet all the deadlines I was given. I allowed myself a block of time that was long enough to complete the task with no distractions. Sometimes I even set a timer. The countdown really motivated me to move quickly. I also made an effort to use my Outlook calendar to be extra organized and keep track of where my time was going.

8. Cook something delicious

I’ve been wanting to work on my cooking skills and the summer was a perfect opportunity to do so. I rarely make recipes off the side of a bag, but I made a recipe for cheesy chicken monterey and it was delicious! The recipe is below:

Cheesy Chicken Monterey

Cheesy Chicken Monterey

You will need:

  • One package of chicken flavored rice (I used Knorr brand)
  • One 11 oz. can of corn , drained
  • One 11 oz. can of black beans, rinsed and drained
  • One 4 oz. can of chopped green chilies, undrained
  • One pound of boneless, skinless chicken breasts, thinly sliced
  • One cup of shredded Monterey Jack cheese (about 4 oz.)
  1. Prepare rice according to the package directions. Stir in corn, beans and chilies.
  2. Meanwhile, heat one tablestoon vegetable oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat and cook chicken, stirring frequently, 4 mins. or until chicken is thoroughly cooked.
  3. Arrange rice mixture on serving platter, then top with chicken and cheese

Here’s to perfecting future mom skills!

9. Learn something new

In an interview with a UNT alum for a story I was writing for UNT’s alumni magazine I asked her if there are any words she lives by. I loved what she told me;

“Stress is a choice. You can decide to use your energy worrying about the problem or finding a situation. You can’t change the situation, but you can change your reaction to the situation.”

I love that she shared that with me and I hope I remember those wise words next time I feel the stress building up.

10. Relax

I didn’t have a lot of time to relax (or sleep) this summer, but there were several days I stopped by the pool after work or had a lazy weekend curled up on the couch with a book. It’s so nice to have had that time to rejuvenate for a busy semester.

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So long, summer 2013. It was wonderful knowing you!

Lessons from a Former Secretary of State

ImageOne of the major advantages of being a college student at a large university is the opportunity to hear world-class speakers on campus at no charge. Tonight I had the opportunity to hear Condoleezza Rice, the United State’s 66th Secretary of State and the first African American woman to hold this position. She shared a little about her experiences as Secretary of State, but I loved the advice she offered to UNT students most of all:

 1. “Find your passion while you’re here in college. If you don’t find it, it just might find you.”

 Students often come to college clueless of which major to pursue and spend a lot of time going from one thing to the next, but it’s important to spend time developing dreams and making them come to life.

2.  “Seek out different opinions. You can never defend your own position until you seek out the other side.”

There are a multitude of perspectives on just about anything you could possibly think of. What one might see as the only answer might not even occur to another. It’s important to take a step of courage to see what the other side sees. Who knows; you might find that you like the other side better.

3.  “Trying hard things is more fulfilling than doing things that come easy to you.”

Although we gravitate toward things that come naturally, sometimes it’s the most rewarding to break out of that comfort zone. The most successful people are often the most well-rounded and courageous. Plus, if you’re constantly challenging yourself, you wont fret the challenges you face because you’ll be more prepared to facing them head-on.

4. “Study abroad!”

There are so many different cultures in this world. For some, college is the best time to explore and even work toward their degree. Traveling helps diversify education and inspires a new sense of wonder.

5. “The best way to be optimistic is to help others that are less fortunate.”

Our culture feeds into materialism and the idea that more is better. With this state of mind, no sum is great enough and you will always find yourself longing for more. Helping others loosens the grip of materialism and tightens the bonds that only compassion can build.

“Helping others changes our mindset from ‘Why don’t I have…?’ to ‘Why do I have so much?”” -Condoleezza Rice

6. “Rights and responsibilities go hand in hand.”

As citizens of this country it’s important to enjoy the freedoms that have been bought with a price, but it’s also important to remember our duties. We should constantly strive to leave a legacy and for things to be left better than when we found them.

7. It doesn’t matter where you’re from, but where you’re going.”

We have all faced hardships, but true leaders overcome these obstacles and focus more on the future rather than the past. Come to terms with your circumstances and understand that surpassing them will only make you stronger.

Thank you Condoleezza Rice for sharing your words of wisdom and thank you, UNT for having speakers that help us learn and grow.