Thoughts on Life and The Awesomeness of College

It’s official…I’m a college graduate! On May 10 I walked across the stage and had the opportunity to celebrate with my family and friends. It was such a bittersweet day. Although I’m sad to see college career come to an end, I’m excited to take the next steps in my career.

Let the future begin!

Let the future begin!

As we all know, college isn’t just about the books. There are so many life lessons the college experience teaches so well. Here are five of my favorites:

1. If you want to achieve goals, make them happen…starting now.

The summer before I went to college, my church’s youth pastor and his wife coached me on college readiness to help prepare me as much as possible for life as a college student. One of the most valuable pieces of wisdom they shared with me was that if I wanted to instill a new habit, I had to start as soon as I arrived to campus or as soon as my semester started. If not, busyness and routine would take over and any hopes of accomplishing that goal would most likely slip through the cracks.

This was GREAT advice. Right when I got to college, I set aside the time I needed to reach my goals, such as going to the gym, staying in touch with family and friends and practicing (I was a music major at the time).

As I plan out what my life will look like in the future, I know it will be more of a challenge to set good habits, as more responsibilities add up. However, it isn’t impossible and achieving goals is important no matter what stage of life I’m in.

2. Mom and Dad are cool.

There’s this shift that happens usually right before high school ends or halfway through the first year of college where mom and dad are suddenly cool! When I left for college I remember being excited to be on my own, but every time my parents made the trip up to Denton for the weekend I was always very excited to spend time with them.

Not only are they cool but also smart, contrary to what my teenage self credited them. I’m thankful that my parents were so involved in my college experience. My mom basically knew more than my advisors and quickly became a pro at helping me plan out my schedules so I could graduate with a degree and a half in four years. I’ve grown rather close to my parents, as I should. They’re the only ones I have.

3. Detours are sometimes the best things that can happen to you. 

I was a double major in music and public relations my first and second years of college. I knew I loved music and also knew I loved to write, although I wasn’t exactly sure I knew what PR was quite yet. As a music student I participated in music ensembles, took lessons and learned theory and music history at one of the most prestigious music schools in the nation. I really enjoyed it, but quickly saw my passion fading after hours on top of hours of practicing and struggling through my music theory assignments.

I finally came to a point where I had to choose. PR won and I’ve never regretted that decision, nor have I regretted the time spent making music at the University of North Texas. Some of my closest friends were made through the marching band and some of my favorite memories were in the music building and performance hall.

4. You don’t have to be the smartest to stand out.

I was honored as the Outstanding PR Student of the Year at the journalism banquet in May, an award chosen by the Mayborn School of Journalism’s faculty. It was a very exciting moment, that’s for sure.

A lot of people who congratulated me said things like, “Wow! You must make really good grades!” The truth is I’ve never been an extremely academic person. I worked VERY hard to make good grades in school, which paid off in the end, but certainly wasn’t a walk in the park for me as it was for some of my friends growing up.

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2014 Outstanding Public Relations Student in the Department of Strategic Communications at UNT

I think the key to being successful and standing out is hard work and being passionate about what you do. During my college career I had seven different internships, was the president of UNT’s Chapter of PRSSA and was the kind of person who attended networking events and watched webinars on her days off. People would always comment on how busy I seemed, but I was just doing what I think is fun! Those internships and tough classes flew by because I absolutely love what I do.

As my youngest sister and cousin graduate from high school this year I sincerely hope they fall in love with their major as I did. It makes college (an life)THAT more awesome and rewarding.

5. Friendships are a gift, not a guarantee

After I graduated high school I started to lose touch with some of people I considered best friends during middle or high school. It was sad at first, but as I changed and grew, my old friends were changing and growing too.

These two drove four hours to come see me graduate! Lindsay (left) has been a best friend of mine for 11 years and Kelsey (right) is a friend I met my freshman year. She transferred to UT Austin for nursing school, but we have stayed close ever since :)

These two drove four hours to come see me graduate! Lindsay (left) has been a best friend of mine for 11 years and Kelsey (right) is a friend I met my freshman year. She transferred to UT Austin for nursing school, but we have stayed close ever since 🙂

There are several friendships I have that have lasted more than ten years, but college taught me the value of learning when to fight for those friendships and when to let go to make room for others. Letting go of friendships is bittersweet, but I can’t think of a time where new friendships weren’t blossoming. I’ve been blessed with wonderful friends and as I’ve grown older, I’ve been even more thankful for these gifts and realized that they are blessings that I am not entitled to.

Here are some of the friends that made college such a wonderful time in my life:

This month I’ll be moving to Dallas, standing by one of the friends I’ve known the longest as she marries the man of her dreams, starting the next chapter in my career and vacationing with my family in Boston. I’ll miss the ability to plan my own schedule, nap times between classes and exciting intern adventures as a college student, but I’m so excited to see what the future has in store.

“ Many are the plans in the mind of a man, but it is the purpose of the Lord that will stand.” – Proverbs 19:21

What are your favorite things about your college experience?

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Reflections on a Mason Jar of Memories

A Mason Jar of Memories from 2013

A Mason Jar of Memories from 2013

I don’t always play board games, but when I do…I typically can’t wait for someone to win so I can do something else.

Maybe I’m no fun, but something about the fact that most board games come with a million little pieces and a novel-sized book of instructions that people don’t read, but still manage to argue about the rules, makes them even less fun. I’d rather do something else, like have a conversation, bake or go outside like people used to do before televisions were invented.

On New Year’s Day I was with my boyfriend, some family and friends, and we started playing his favorite board game. I was reluctant at first, but since I was in the holiday spirit and figured it wouldn’t kill me, I went ahead and joined in. Seeing the delight on his face was something I wasn’t expecting. He was genuinely appreciative that I put aside my preferences and played his favorite game. Although it wasn’t a tremendous sacrifice on my part, it brought me joy in return and I started to think this would be a great continuation of my New Year’s resolution from last year.

Choosing Contentment

In 2013 I resolved to be more content and positive with my life the way it is. I have a perfectionist mindset, which often makes it hard to appreciate what is going right and focus on fixing what isn’t. To help me accomplish this new mindset I wrote down positive experiences and thoughts, and put them in a jar on my dresser. After ringing in the New Year, I read through all the little slips of paper. I remembered sweet conversations over mugs of coffee, thoughtful gifts I didn’t deserve from friends and family members, and the feeling of accomplishment that washed over me after seeing my work in print for the first time. Others included waking up to beautiful sunsets, volunteering at philanthropic community events and random acts of kindness.

Last year wasn’t perfect, but looking back on the positive things reminded me that everything doesn’t have to be perfect for a year to be productive in accomplishing my goals. The strange thing is, I really didn’t even make specific goals when I decided what I would focus on in 2013. In addition, I felt much more successful than I had in years before when I wrote out a ton of things I wanted to change about my life.

Redefining Resolutions

Instead of a resolution that limits your possibilities, why not choose a word instead?

As a former, overly obsessive resolutionist, I know that more resolutions are abandoned than achieved, and the most apparent reason for that is the fact that most resolutions are about the person making them. As I looked back through all of the positive moments from 2013, I was reminded that contentment, which is defined as “a state of happiness or satisfaction,” is the key to accepting what I have without longing for more or struggling to be someone else every time January rolls around. If I’m distracted by what I don’t have, I can’t see past my own failures and can’t possibly be in tune with meeting the needs of others. Contentment is an open door to freedom from greed, envy, selfishness and severe expectations. Although contentment can’t solve all of life’s problems, it’s a great place to start.

Contentment takes discipline and can be difficult in our world where we know little of actual need, but reading through each of the positive things that happened in 2013, I was reminded that the good far outweighs the bad.

Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough.                                    – Oprah Winfrey

Thankfulness

When contentment is achieved, thankfulness is the result. Thankfulness is a relational benefit of contentment, which is “expressive of thanks,” and “aware and appreciative of a benefit.” Oftentimes thankfulness obliges selflessness, which can lead to making sacrifices for the benefit of others. There are so many people and things to be thankful for and I sincerely hope that this year I will more effectively recognize what is lovely and worthy of gratitude (and even things that aren’t) and respond with self-sacrifice and love.

I would love to hear about the word you’ve chosen to focus on in 2014.

Wishing you a blessed New Year!

Icepocalypse 2013

It’s rarely very cold in Texas, but this winter is off to a chilly start. Last Thursday was the beginning of what UNT students called the “Icepocalypse” in Denton. I was cooped up in my apartment for several days and campus was closed for nearly a week, but the ice is finally starting to melt away.

Fortunately my power didn’t go out, but a few friends in Dallas weren’t so lucky. My old roommate and close friend, Nicole Bell, told me she was stuck in apartment without power. My roommates and I invited her over and after battling traffic and icy roads, she finally arrived with a bridesmaid dress and suitcase in tow, a little disappointed that her flight to North Carolina for her best friend’s wedding had been postponed.

Screen shot 2013-12-12 at 10.34.06 PMTwo nights of movies, laughter and failed attempts to drive on the ice passed and she was finally on her way to the airport. I checked with her later that day to make sure she made it to the airport safely and she had big news. She was asked to film a video diary for ABC News! The reporter had found her on Twitter and after she filmed some of the airport madness her clip was played on Good Morning America that night! Her hashtag #NicoleStranded2013 made for some good laughs and it was cool to see one of my best friends in the world on the news! I thought this was also a great example of how being in the right place at the right time can have its perks, even if it’s a life-giving-you-lemons kind of situation.

(Side note: People’s flights were canceled so they brought in some clowns? Uhh…)

As for me, finals week was condensed into three days (That’s another story for another day) and all of my finals were on the same day. It’s good to be done for the fall and even more strange to be registered for my last semester as a college student. For now, bring on the Christmas cookies!

Preparing to A.C.H.I.E.V.E.

IMG_8575This year I attended my last PRSSA National Conference. Although I’m excited to graduate and enter the real world this May, it was bittersweet to leave Philadelphia knowing that it was the last time I’d attend Conference as a student.

During the awards dinner on the last night we were all given a note card that says, “today’s preparation determines tomorrow’s achievement.” On the back is an acronym for A.C.H.I.E.V.E., which I think is an excellent summary of the insight shared during PRSSA National Conference.

A is for aspire.

Aspiration has been a main theme of every PRSSA event I’ve attended. Aspire means to align your hopes toward achieving something. PRSSA encourages students to set big goals and chase after them, which is, of course, much easier said than done.

Mary Henige and Mary Beth West are admirable speakers who presented at Conference. These two women are strong role models for pre-professionals and encouraged attendees to stretch further to achieve success. Here are some words of wisdom given during their presentations:

  • Be a life-long learner. I was surprised to see that even West was taking notes when the other panelists were speaking during the Living Legends panel, showing that she embraces that there is always more to learn!
  • Showing up is not enough. Have a roll-up-your sleeves approach to your work.
  • Squeeze everything you can out of college. Learn all you can so you’ll leave with a rounded education.
  • Don’t underestimate the power of reverse mentoring. Just because you’re young does not mean you can’t teach others who are older than you.
  • It’s okay to not know where you’re going, but everything you do should be driven by goals.
  • Quality of experience not quantity (salary). A person of initiative doesn’t sit back and get frustrated about something, they change it. – Mary Heinigie
  • Applying for jobs is scary. Don’t let that stop you.

 “Don’t create obstacles for yourself- stop thinking of yourself as a woman. Think of yourself as a professional” – Mary Beth West

It all comes down to the fact that it’s not someone else’s job to prepare you for your career. College is the best time to start your legacy of initiative and integrity.

C is for challenge

Brian Solis, Principal Analyst at Altimeter Group presented on  learning how to #LeanForward

Brian Solis, Principal Analyst at Altimeter Group presented on learning how to #LeanForward

One of my favorite parts of PRSSA National Conference is sitting in on PRSA ICON sessions. This year Brian Solis presented on leaning forward. Although my generation grew up with social media, I know it will not stop with what we have now. Social media is always changing and what’s “in” today won’t necessarily be “in” tomorrow. It’s important to embrace change and avoid pulling back, because brands that embrace change are the brands that stay relevant to consumers

Social media has a reputation of being narcissistic, but when social media is done well, it’s not about me, or the brand I’m representing. The A.R.T. of social media is actions, reactions and transactions. We live in an age where brands are now people and people are now brands. How can we leverage this as PR professionals?

Here is a Storify summary of the Twitter conversations revolving around Solis’ lecture.

 “Humbly recognize there’s more to learn. Learning helps us lead and learning brings about change.” – Brian Solis #LeanForward

H is for hope

When I was a kid I didn’t think twice about how fortunate I was that I could read. The PRSA ICON presentation by John Wood, who explained how a library card could be the passport to a better life, was very inspiring. Wood is very passionate about making education accessible to boys and girls all over the world. In fact, he is so passionate about this mission that he quit his job at Microsoft to develop his nonprofit organization, Room to Read, from scratch.

I was deeply touched by this man’s passion and willingness to take a risk. He taught that bold goals attract bold people and that hope can go a long way. He encourages attendees to strive for more than just small-scale leadership. “Don’t be the leader of an organization,” he said. “I want to be one of many leaders of a global movement.”

As a future professional it’s important to have big, hairy audacious goals (B.H.A.G.S.) and learn to have hope in what might seem impossible.

“An entrepreneur is someone who does something with resources not yet acquired.” – John Wood, Room to Read

I is for insight

Kingsford Coal's data-driven campaign included sending a special visitor to the nicest social media user. Clever!

Kingsford Coal’s data-driven campaign included sending a special visitor to the nicest social media user. Clever!

Insight is a key asset for job seekers to leverage themselves as an asset to a public relations team. Valuable hires come into a company ready to put their knowledge to work for a company or a brand. In a session on analytics and big data led by Adam Singer, Shonali Burke and Deidre Breakenridge, we learned a few of the ways data is used in real-world applications:

  • Use data to tell stories with visual representations.
  • Use data to pitch- No one likes receiving pitches that are not based on factual evidence.
  • Use data to influence strategy decisions.
  • Use data to predict future outcomes.

One of the best examples given was for crises. Data can help make responses more efficient and can even save lives. Another good example discussed was the clever campaign created for Kingsford Coal, which involved sending Santa to visit the nicest social media user. The lucky winner in the photo (left) was found through data-driven research. The number of times he said, “thank you” and “please” on social media were monitored and his politeness was recognized. Who knew good manners could help you win a visit from Santa?

Here are some of the basic tools PR students can familiarize themselves with, suggested by Adam Singer from Google:

E is for enthusiasm

Of the many areas in PR, agency life was emphasized in the sessions at Conference. Juggling life at an agency is often challenging for new professionals that are employed at agencies right after college.

New professionals are typically younger, unmarried and can handle more stress than employees that have been in the workforce for a longer period of time. Because of this, they are often pushed to accomplish more. Every professional is faced with the challenge at one time or another to decide their limit and maintain the work-life balance that works for them. In addition, if you’re enthusiastic about your job it won’t feel like work, but if you dread going to the office, it might be time to try something new.

Members of the panel included Jessica Noonan of Burson-Marsteller, Joe Clarkson of Taylor Strategy and Nick Lucido of Edelman Public Relations. Here are a few tips they shared during the panel discussion:

  • Have an outlet for creativity and fun. Too much work will inevitably lead to burnout.
  • Don’t work hard; work smart. Working inefficiently is actually a disservice for your clients.
  • Love what you do, because if you’re in it for the money, you’re in for a let-down.

“Be nice to people. The PR world is very, very small and your relationships can help or hurt you.” –Nick Lucido, Edelman Public Relations

V is for voice

There was a special session for Chapter presidents on the first night of Conference. Cassandra Bailey, principal at Slice Communications in Philadelphia shared her wisdom on the importance of uniqueness and drive. She advised students to embrace personal branding as a chance to show authenticity and individuality.

Here are some of her key points:

  • Ideas, time and insights are the currency of PR agencies. What values do your ideas have over those of other agencies?
  • Your personal brand should be unique as a fingerprint. What’s unique about you? How can you communicate this with others?
  • There is inherent value in being different. How can your voice be distinguishable in the sea of noise?

“There is inherent value in being different.” –Cassandra Bailey

E is for enjoy

With all the sessions and presentations at PRSSANC and PRSA ICON, luckily I found some time to enjoy Philadelphia. I ate a Philadelphia cheese steak (Two, actually. We found a place called Zio’s that was so we good we had to come back again before leaving the city), visited LOVE park, saw the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall, and even made some new friends.

This post would be incomplete without photos from the trip!

If you are a PR student I highly recommend joining PRSSA and attending National Conference. Although it’s expensive, attending events helps you meet speakers and other PRSSA members that will help you learn and grow as a future professional. I am so thankful I joined this organization as a sophomore journalism student and that I invested as much as I have so far. I know what I’ve learned and the connections I’ve made will help me succeed as a professional in the pubic relations industry.

View my PRSSANC Recap presentation for UNT PRSSA on Prezi.

Summer Top Ten

As my last day of summer winds down (already?) and I prepare to return to classes for my last fall semester as a college student tomorrow it’s bittersweet, but also exciting. All this hard work is paying off and I’ve had so much fun along the way.

I compiled a lit of my favorite memories or accomplishments from this summer. Although my internship and job didn’t provide me with too much time off, this year I wanted to complete the ten things below:

1. Go somewhere exciting

This year my family went to Alaska. My mom had a goal to travel to all 50 states before her 50th birthday and Alaska was her 49th state (North Dakota was her 50th).  We went on an Alaskan cruise and stopped at Juneau, Icy Strait Point and Ketchikan. We went sea kayaking and I rode the longest zip line in the world! It was a great vacation. Here are a few photos of the trip’s highlights:

2. Intern at an agency

I had the opportunity to intern at an international agency in Dallas this summer with the Digital Team. I learned a lot about social media and analytics and loved being surrounded by young, brilliant PR professionals.

3. Reconnect with PRSSA friends

As president of UNT PRSSA, I had the honor, once again, of representing my Chapter at the PRSSA 2013 Leadership Rally! It was great to see friends new and old and learn more about the profession and planning a great semester. Want to see my notes from the last two years at the Rally? Download the PDF: PRSSA Leadership Rally Notes 2012-13.

When I was in Scottsdale, Arizona I had the opportunity to stop by the scene of summer’s most hilarious PR crisis, Amy’s Baking Company. In case you missed it, view the video here. Although I didn’t have bad service or witness anything notable, it was fun to see the infamous husband and wife team in person after seeing so much about them for a month. Plus, my lemon meringue pie was delicious.

4. Get published

My latest position at UNT has allowed me the opportunity to get my work published several times. I wrote several stories that were posted on UNT’s InHouse blog and even a few news releases. Maybe I’m just new at this, but I get excited every time I see my work published.

5. Read a good book

One of the best books I read this summer was on the airplane to the PRSSA Leadership Rally. It’s called The One Minute Manager. It wasn’t what I was expecting, but I loved the way it was written and the advice it had for busy, successful leaders.

You set One Minute Goals with your people to make sure they know what they are being held accountable for and what good performance looks like. You then try to catch them doing something right so you can give them a One Minute Praising. And then, finally, if they have all the skills to do something right and they don’t, you give them a One Minute Reprimand.

I loved this book because it taught me a lot about leadership and helping those that are following you better understand expectations and how to make them feel valued and appreciated, while at the same time, getting things done.

6. Make a new friend

I always love making new friends. I was at church one Sunday and I sat down next to a girl I didn’t recognize. After talking with her for a few minutes I found that she was from out of state and had come to Denton to take a 5-week class for her major that was only offered at UNT. She didn’t know anyone, so I made myself available and saw her many more times before she flew back to Indiana! I was so thankful I randomly sat down by her and I hope to see her again someday soon.

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Thankful for good times with friends this summer

7. Start one new good habit

I’m really hoping this habit carries over into the school year, but I focused a lot on productivity and prioritization this summer. Time is money and at my internship, I had to be fast in order to meet all the deadlines I was given. I allowed myself a block of time that was long enough to complete the task with no distractions. Sometimes I even set a timer. The countdown really motivated me to move quickly. I also made an effort to use my Outlook calendar to be extra organized and keep track of where my time was going.

8. Cook something delicious

I’ve been wanting to work on my cooking skills and the summer was a perfect opportunity to do so. I rarely make recipes off the side of a bag, but I made a recipe for cheesy chicken monterey and it was delicious! The recipe is below:

Cheesy Chicken Monterey

Cheesy Chicken Monterey

You will need:

  • One package of chicken flavored rice (I used Knorr brand)
  • One 11 oz. can of corn , drained
  • One 11 oz. can of black beans, rinsed and drained
  • One 4 oz. can of chopped green chilies, undrained
  • One pound of boneless, skinless chicken breasts, thinly sliced
  • One cup of shredded Monterey Jack cheese (about 4 oz.)
  1. Prepare rice according to the package directions. Stir in corn, beans and chilies.
  2. Meanwhile, heat one tablestoon vegetable oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat and cook chicken, stirring frequently, 4 mins. or until chicken is thoroughly cooked.
  3. Arrange rice mixture on serving platter, then top with chicken and cheese

Here’s to perfecting future mom skills!

9. Learn something new

In an interview with a UNT alum for a story I was writing for UNT’s alumni magazine I asked her if there are any words she lives by. I loved what she told me;

“Stress is a choice. You can decide to use your energy worrying about the problem or finding a situation. You can’t change the situation, but you can change your reaction to the situation.”

I love that she shared that with me and I hope I remember those wise words next time I feel the stress building up.

10. Relax

I didn’t have a lot of time to relax (or sleep) this summer, but there were several days I stopped by the pool after work or had a lazy weekend curled up on the couch with a book. It’s so nice to have had that time to rejuvenate for a busy semester.

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So long, summer 2013. It was wonderful knowing you!