“A Tweet Away From Being Fired”

Free speech means you can say what you want, right?

Not without consequences—a painful lesson PR pro Justine Sacco learned last December when she tweeted what many people labeled “racist” and “insensitive.”

Her tweet is pictured below:

Justine Sacco tweet

Shortly after she boarded her plane in London, the tweet went viral. While she was unavailable on her flight to South Africa, her company fired her, Twitter users mocked her with the hash tag #HasJustineLandedYet and reporters waited to interview her at the airport in South Africa. Needless to say, she was embarrassed and ashamed. It didn’t take her long to post an apology, but her name now carries the weight of her costly mistake.

As one of “The Five” on Fox said, “We are all one tweet away from being fired.”

Note that Sacco was never arrested or fined by the government for what she tweeted. The First Amendment protected her rights to free speech, but just because there was no legal action involved doesn’t mean there were no consequences. In addition, she was a PR professional, which should imply an expertise in reputation management. When she landed in South Africa she had to some reputation management of her own to handle.

The First Amendment allows U.S. citizens:

  • Freedom of religion
  • Freedom of speech
  • Freedom of the press
  • Freedom of assembly
  • Right to petition

These are all beautiful rights to have and we are fortunate to be entitled to our own opinions, practice whatever religions we choose and protest. In the case above, Sacco was allowed to tweet essentially whatever she wanted, but obviously suffered consequences.

This freedom is not the same in every country. In the UK, social media users can be prosecuted for what they say online. According to The Daily Beast, for example, a Staffordshire man was arrested and had his computer confiscated for a tasteless Mandela joke. (I’ll let you look that one up.) Furthermore, the article states that, “In the United Kingdom, it is now the police’s remit to protect communities and individuals from “alarm,” “distress,” and “offense.”” Is this method of enforcement taking things a step too far? Possibly, but it can be argued that our current world is one where what is said on social media is amplified in a way that has a broader impact than just sticks and stones.

Take Paul Chambers, for example. Brian Solis explains in a blog post how this 27-year-old Twitter user got into some legal trouble with a recent tweet in 2010 that essentially threatened to blow up the airport. Whether or not his tweet was taken out of context, it isn’t okay to even hint at taking action that might threaten the lives of others. This is no different than yelling about a bomb at an airport or yelling, “fire” in a movie theater. We have freedom of speech and “Freedom of Tweet” as Solis calls it, but when what we say might infer a risk to someone’s life, there’s a good chance legal action will be taken. He was fined, faced conviction and also lost his job.

Our First Amendment rights should be celebrated, but with rights come great responsibility, especially as a public relations professional or organization. As PR pros we are expected to value ethical use of advocacy, honesty, expertise, fairness, independence, loyalty and fairness, according to the PRSA Code of Ethics.

Tweeting anything that might be racist, unfair or dishonest most likely reflects poorly on your company, not just you. And besides, what can you gain by saying something that might be hurtful to someone else?

It all comes down to professionalism and respect. No one wants to hire a PR person that can’t even maintain their own image, much less, their client’s.

Know your resources

work hard and be nice

Image from behance.net

Know the PRSA Code of Ethics and stay current with industry news because with the nature of social media it can be easy to forget the impact words can have on others. In addition, many companies have values or specific Code of Ethics for employees to know and practice. Some companies even have a social media policy, which can be helpful.

Value diversity

Many of the people called out for what they’ve tweeted have been accused of being racist or ignorant. It’s so important to value diversity because diversity is everywhere. It’s not wrong to be different and although no one can possibly agree with everything, it’s still important to be respectful and objective, even on personal social media accounts.

ALWAYS think before you post

It seems silly to remind people to think before using social media, but everyone makes mistakes. Mistakes on Twitter are now more costly than ever. Always think about what you say and how it can impact others before tweeting or posting online.

Although we are each one tweet away from losing our jobs, it’s important not to see this as a limitation, but instead a protection for our employers, our profession and even our own credibility.

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Is an #UNselfie mindset possible in a #selfie world?

Shouldn't every day be an #UNselfie day?

Shouldn’t every day be an #UNselfie day?

Forget chocolate. Selfies are society’s new guilty pleasure.

So what exactly is a selfie?

Oxford Dictionary’s “Word of the Year” for 2013 is defined as, “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” More than 90 million selfies have been posted across social media channels since the word was first used in an Australian forum in 2002. Since then, selfies have become widely popular among social media users, including celebrities, political figures and athletes.

It didn’t take long for technology to adapt to the trend by creating front-facing cameras and smartphones to accommodate selfie photographers. It’s no surprise that Facebook, Twitter and especially Instagram are loaded with them and that Instagram’s most used hash tag is #me.

Don’t you think it’s all a little narcissistic?

Unleashing the #UNselfie

This week was the second annual Giving Tuesday.

A number of what users are calling #UNselfie photos were posted featuring people holding signs supporting charities and advocating self-sacrifice.

This day of giving was initially launched by New York’s 92nd Street Y , the United Foundation and the Case Foundation and has since rallied thousands of nonprofits to reach out to prospective donors and share the importance of giving. The hope behind the campaign is inspiring similar fervor to that of Black Friday sales, according to Forbes.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve never seen people camp out for days in advance and line up for blocks just to help others.

Comparison of #selfie posts and posts about giving

Comparison of #selfie posts and posts about giving

An Instagram hashtag search on Giving Tuesday pulled up more than 60 million photos tagged #selfie, but less than 600 thousand photos were tagged with the top five commonly used hashtags about giving: #giving, #givingback, #givingtuesday, #unselfie and #givingbacktothecommunity.

It’s heart-warming to see the reaction to the movement dedicated to giving through #UNselfies over social media and  I don’t want to discount the compassion behind anyone’s efforts to make a difference, but shouldn’t every day be a giving day?

In Conclusion…

Let’s face it; we’re all guilty of taking selfies and putting our wants above the needs of others at one time or another. Living in a #selfie culture makes it easy to forget that giving isn’t only something we should do during the holidays. Wouldn’t it be nice if we greeted every day with thanksgiving without a turkey dinner, gave without expecting anything in return and felt immense joy in the absence of a decorated tree or presents?

I challenge you to give this Christmas season, but to also continue giving long after the tree and lights are packed away. Do your part to make your life a walking #UNselfie. As many have said before, it’s much better to give than to receive.

Wouldn’t it be nice if we greeted every day with thanksgiving without a turkey dinner, gave without expecting anything in return and felt immense joy in the absence of a decorated tree or presents?

Summer Top Ten

As my last day of summer winds down (already?) and I prepare to return to classes for my last fall semester as a college student tomorrow it’s bittersweet, but also exciting. All this hard work is paying off and I’ve had so much fun along the way.

I compiled a lit of my favorite memories or accomplishments from this summer. Although my internship and job didn’t provide me with too much time off, this year I wanted to complete the ten things below:

1. Go somewhere exciting

This year my family went to Alaska. My mom had a goal to travel to all 50 states before her 50th birthday and Alaska was her 49th state (North Dakota was her 50th).  We went on an Alaskan cruise and stopped at Juneau, Icy Strait Point and Ketchikan. We went sea kayaking and I rode the longest zip line in the world! It was a great vacation. Here are a few photos of the trip’s highlights:

2. Intern at an agency

I had the opportunity to intern at an international agency in Dallas this summer with the Digital Team. I learned a lot about social media and analytics and loved being surrounded by young, brilliant PR professionals.

3. Reconnect with PRSSA friends

As president of UNT PRSSA, I had the honor, once again, of representing my Chapter at the PRSSA 2013 Leadership Rally! It was great to see friends new and old and learn more about the profession and planning a great semester. Want to see my notes from the last two years at the Rally? Download the PDF: PRSSA Leadership Rally Notes 2012-13.

When I was in Scottsdale, Arizona I had the opportunity to stop by the scene of summer’s most hilarious PR crisis, Amy’s Baking Company. In case you missed it, view the video here. Although I didn’t have bad service or witness anything notable, it was fun to see the infamous husband and wife team in person after seeing so much about them for a month. Plus, my lemon meringue pie was delicious.

4. Get published

My latest position at UNT has allowed me the opportunity to get my work published several times. I wrote several stories that were posted on UNT’s InHouse blog and even a few news releases. Maybe I’m just new at this, but I get excited every time I see my work published.

5. Read a good book

One of the best books I read this summer was on the airplane to the PRSSA Leadership Rally. It’s called The One Minute Manager. It wasn’t what I was expecting, but I loved the way it was written and the advice it had for busy, successful leaders.

You set One Minute Goals with your people to make sure they know what they are being held accountable for and what good performance looks like. You then try to catch them doing something right so you can give them a One Minute Praising. And then, finally, if they have all the skills to do something right and they don’t, you give them a One Minute Reprimand.

I loved this book because it taught me a lot about leadership and helping those that are following you better understand expectations and how to make them feel valued and appreciated, while at the same time, getting things done.

6. Make a new friend

I always love making new friends. I was at church one Sunday and I sat down next to a girl I didn’t recognize. After talking with her for a few minutes I found that she was from out of state and had come to Denton to take a 5-week class for her major that was only offered at UNT. She didn’t know anyone, so I made myself available and saw her many more times before she flew back to Indiana! I was so thankful I randomly sat down by her and I hope to see her again someday soon.

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Thankful for good times with friends this summer

7. Start one new good habit

I’m really hoping this habit carries over into the school year, but I focused a lot on productivity and prioritization this summer. Time is money and at my internship, I had to be fast in order to meet all the deadlines I was given. I allowed myself a block of time that was long enough to complete the task with no distractions. Sometimes I even set a timer. The countdown really motivated me to move quickly. I also made an effort to use my Outlook calendar to be extra organized and keep track of where my time was going.

8. Cook something delicious

I’ve been wanting to work on my cooking skills and the summer was a perfect opportunity to do so. I rarely make recipes off the side of a bag, but I made a recipe for cheesy chicken monterey and it was delicious! The recipe is below:

Cheesy Chicken Monterey

Cheesy Chicken Monterey

You will need:

  • One package of chicken flavored rice (I used Knorr brand)
  • One 11 oz. can of corn , drained
  • One 11 oz. can of black beans, rinsed and drained
  • One 4 oz. can of chopped green chilies, undrained
  • One pound of boneless, skinless chicken breasts, thinly sliced
  • One cup of shredded Monterey Jack cheese (about 4 oz.)
  1. Prepare rice according to the package directions. Stir in corn, beans and chilies.
  2. Meanwhile, heat one tablestoon vegetable oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat and cook chicken, stirring frequently, 4 mins. or until chicken is thoroughly cooked.
  3. Arrange rice mixture on serving platter, then top with chicken and cheese

Here’s to perfecting future mom skills!

9. Learn something new

In an interview with a UNT alum for a story I was writing for UNT’s alumni magazine I asked her if there are any words she lives by. I loved what she told me;

“Stress is a choice. You can decide to use your energy worrying about the problem or finding a situation. You can’t change the situation, but you can change your reaction to the situation.”

I love that she shared that with me and I hope I remember those wise words next time I feel the stress building up.

10. Relax

I didn’t have a lot of time to relax (or sleep) this summer, but there were several days I stopped by the pool after work or had a lazy weekend curled up on the couch with a book. It’s so nice to have had that time to rejuvenate for a busy semester.

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So long, summer 2013. It was wonderful knowing you!